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COVID-19 vaccinations

 

Update on Covid-19 Vaccinations

Dear Patient,

Modbury Health Centre joined with nine other local GP surgeries to begin delivering the Covid-19 vaccination to our patients. With only ten days’ notice and rapidly developing guidance a huge amount of work was required to get this service live.

We are very grateful to the Diocese of Plymouth for supporting us by providing a site from which our nine GP practices can deliver the campaign, whilst enabling us to continue operating our usual services in practice. 

The total patient population for the nine surgeries is approximately 75,000 and every individual is required to have two vaccines.

The scale of the campaign is like nothing we have previously experienced. 

As a result of this the vaccination programme will last for many months. It is inevitable that along with the ongoing impact of staff self-isolation, this additional workload will cause some disruption to our usual day to day services, both clinical and administrative. Whilst we will do everything we can to mitigate this we ask that you bear with us over the coming weeks and months.

Moving forward we will be contacting patients as and when we are able to offer them the vaccine. The timelines will depend on eligibility, clinical capacity and access to the vaccine. Below is the current priority list, identified by the government, which we will be following. Please do not contact the surgery to request a vaccination or query when you will become eligible. 
 

1 - Residents in a care home for older adults and their carers
2 - All those aged 80 and over, as well as frontline health and social care workers
3 - All those aged 75 and over
4 - All those aged 70 and over, as well as clinically extremely vulnerable individuals
5 - All those aged 65 and over
- All individuals aged 16-64 with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality
- All those aged 60 and over
- All those aged 55 and over
- All those aged 50 and over

If you are interested in getting an idea as to when you may become eligible then the following calculator can give a rough indication:

Vaccine Queue Calculator for the UK (omnicalculator.com)

 

We I would like to thank all of our staff who have worked evenings and weekends to ensure that we were able to set up our services and for those volunteers who have already stepped up to help with the running of our Covid-10 vaccination programme.#

 

How local people can play their part–updated

 How local people can play their partupdated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
 
  1. Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:Every time you leave your home you risk coming into contact with an infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions could be a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19. People in Devon have really helped by following the government guidance seriously. If everyone does as they are asked, our hospitals and other services will cope.
  1. When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: The NHS will get in touch with you when it’s your turn to be vaccinated. Please attend your appointment. You will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive –both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective. Please help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine –the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn. Blocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.
  1. You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. Having the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19, but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed. It is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.
  1. Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’.
  1. Use the NHS in the best way. Think 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
 How local people can play their partupdated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.How local people can play their partupdated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
 
It shows that 86,349 peoplehave received their first jab in the NHS Devon CCG area.The proportion of people aged over 80 in Devon is higher than the regional and national average.How local people can play their partupdated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
 
It shows that 86,349 peoplehave received their first jab in the NHS Devon CCG area.The proportion of people aged over 80 in Devon is higher than the regional and national average.How local people can play their partupdated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pha
 
 
It shows that 86,349 peoplehave received their first jab in the NHS Devon CCG area.The proportion of people aged over 80 in Devon is higher than the regional and national average.How local people can play their partupdated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
rmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.

How local people can play their part

How local people can play their part – updated
1. Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at
home as much as possible:
o Every time you leave your home you risk coming into contact with an
infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump
which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions could be a
crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone
becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.
o People in Devon have really helped by following the government
guidance seriously. If everyone does as they are asked, our hospitals
and other services will cope.
2. When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up:
o The NHS will get in touch with you when it’s your turn to be
vaccinated.
o Please attend your appointment.
o You will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive –
both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.
o Please help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about
getting the vaccine – the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.
o Blocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare
and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.
3. You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated.
o Having the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from
COVID-19, but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.
o It is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands,
face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.
4. Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’.
5. Use the NHS in the best way
o Think 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care,
pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
How local people can play their part
updated 1.Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not bStay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at home as much as possible:oEvery time you leave your home you risk coming into contact withan infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions couldbe a crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.oPeople in Devon have really helped by following thegovernment guidanceseriously. If everyone does as they are asked,our hospitals and other services will cope.e offered a choice of which vaccination you receive both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff timand other services will cope.2.When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up: oThe NHS will get in touch with you when its your turn to be vaccinated.oPlease attend your appointment.oYou will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive bHow local people can play their part – updated
1. Stay at home: The best thing the public can do to help the NHS is to stay at
home as much as possible:
o Every time you leave your home you risk coming into contact with an
infected person or touching a surface or door handle or petrol pump
which may be contaminated. Any one of these interactions could be a
crucial link in the chain of transmission which could lead to someone
becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19.
o People in Devon have really helped by following the government
guidance seriously. If everyone does as they are asked, our hospitals
and other services will cope.
2. When you get your call from the NHS for your vaccine, please take it up:
o The NHS will get in touch with you when it’s your turn to be
vaccinated.
o Please attend your appointment.
o You will not be offered a choice of which vaccination you receive –
both approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.
o Please help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about
getting the vaccine – the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.
o Blocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare
and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.
3. You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated.
o Having the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from
COVID-19, but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.
o It is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands,
face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.
4. Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’.
5. Use the NHS in the best way
o Think 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care,
pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.
Vaccinations
oth approved vaccines are rigorously tested, safe and effective.
oPlease help us by not calling your local hospital or GP practice about getting the vaccine the NHS will contact you when it’s your turn.oBlocking phonelines with queries stops other people getting healthcare and diverts staff time, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.e, meaning the vaccine rollout will be slower
.3.You may still transmit Covid after you have been vaccinated. oHaving the vaccine should protect you from becoming seriously ill from COVID-19,but you may still be a risk to others if you are exposed.oIt is crucial that you continue to observe the ‘stay at home’ and ‘hands, face, space’ advice until advised that it is no longer necessary.4.Follow the government guidance: ‘Hands, Face, Space’. 5.Use the NHS in the best wayoThink 111 first; or choose the right service for your needs: self-care, pharmacists, local minor injury services or your GP.

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